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Family Inc: Viewing Your Career as Investments (Guest Post)

Family Inc: Viewing Your Career as Investments (Guest Post)

Since we are on the topic of job switching, I thought of writing some financial and non-financial decision points I considered when making these decisions that I had over the years.

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This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and 800+ followers.

However, these thoughts are rather jumbled up in the head. And this week, is not the most conducive to think about these things because I am picking up some stuff… that requires a little bit more manpower.

So perhaps that will be left to next week.

One book that have been on my mind to write about was this book called Family Inc.

This is not a very popular book, but you can find a few in your national library. I planned to see if I can do a series on this book because I find a lot of what he talked about my resonate with my readers here.

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Daily Leverage Certificates – A Whole New World (Guest Post)

Daily Leverage Certificates – A Whole New World (Guest Post)

First introduced in July 2017, I felt that DLC hasn’t been well understood by the market for its use and purpose other than being perceived as yet another leveraged product to stay away from. Leveraged products need not be risky when controlled properly and used appropriately. It’s actually an opportunity for retail investors to act and benefit like a hedge fund.

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This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kenny is a community member on InvestingNote, with username known as KennyChia and 300+ followers.

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7 Areas to Think About when Planning for Retirement as a Single Person (Guest Post)

7 Areas to Think About when Planning for Retirement as a Single Person (Guest Post)

I have been single for a large part of my life.And if you are doing some planning for your finances going forward, some aspects that you will think about as a single will be whether there are things that I didn’t realize I need, just because I am single.

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This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and 700+ followers.

There are some things that I am concerned about, and they do not start with money. The clearest is that in the event of different degrees of disability, how would that affect my life? How much higher cost would I need to support such a change in lifestyle?

Kiplinger came up with an article titled Planning for Retirement as a Single Person that I thought is pretty good. I thought it will be those articles we can gloss over but turns out it covers different aspects.

I listed out some of those points without the flowery words. For the singles like myself, it might be good to take a look and see if you will need to cover some of your bases.

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Buy & Hold (Guest Post)

Buy & Hold (Guest Post)

I been holding the current 9 stocks since 2016.
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This post was originally posted here. The writer, theintelligentinvestor is a veteran community member on InvestingNote, with username known as TII and 1100+ followers.

While there were some stocks that I have bought and sold off, most were done during 2016. There were hardly any position taken after 2017 so we can assume my portfolio as the aggregate of the 9 stocks and also it can be considered it as a buy & hold strategy with the holding period of 3.5 years.

Stocks.cafe provides the daily data of the portfolio time-weighted returns vs the STI ETF or ES3 which can be downloaded to Excel. I have plotted 2 graphs, the top is the my portfolio TII (in green) vs STI ETF (in Blue); the bottom is the difference between the 2 top lines.

The top graph first. The STI, since 2016, has moved within a window of -10% to +32%. The 2016 was quite flat; 2017 was a good year up 20%; 2018 was poor down -7%; and 2019 YTD is up 9%. The first point I want to make is if you are trying to trade during these 3.5 years which quite a lot of world events had happened. Well, you can try to hop in Feb 2016, enjoy the 2 years ride and get off in Mar 2018 and wait patiently for 9 months and get in back again around Dec 2018. Sounds simple but many will know it is not easy. When to get in, when to get out, how long to wait during in and out periods? There are just too many variables and moving parts to make sense of.

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The Astrea V Structured PE Bond – 3.85% Yield for Class A-1 available for Retail Investors (Guest Post)

The Astrea V Structured PE Bond – 3.85% Yield for Class A-1 available for Retail Investors (Guest Post)

Last year around the same time, in early June, Azalea Capital issued their Astrea IV bond.
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This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and 700+ followers.

Last year around the same time, in early June, Azalea Capital issued their Astrea IV bond.

What was significant was that this was the first bond that Azalea Capital open a specific tranche that retail investors are able to purchase with smaller denomination. The reception for Azalea IV was very good.

And so now, 1 year later, Azalea Capital decide to release the Astrea V.

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Is Investing In Growth Always A Good Thing? (Guest Post)

Is Investing In Growth Always A Good Thing? (Guest Post)

This post was originally posted here. The writer is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as 3Fs.

When investors like us invest in the stock market, the goal is always trying to grow our wealth over time.

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Investors are generally thrilled by the prospect of growth in general, whether they are referring to their income, savings or even the companies that they invest in.

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3 Amazing Growth Stocks Flying Under The Radar (Guest Post)

3 Amazing Growth Stocks Flying Under The Radar (Guest Post)

This post was originally posted here. The writer is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as SmallCapAsia.

 

With a higher than average tolerance for risk, I’m a big fan of growth shares and you’ll find a number in my portfolio.

I’m looking at adding a couple more to my portfolio in the near future and three that I’m considering are listed below.

#1 United Global Limited (SGX: 43P)

United Global Limited is an independent lubricant manufacturer and trader providing a wide range of high quality and well-engineered lubricants.

The company produce their own in-house lubricant brands such as “United Oil”, “U Star Lube”, “Bell 1”, “HydroPure” and “Ichiro” as well as manufacturing lubricants for third-party principals’ brands.

United Global Limited serves clients mainly from the automotive, industrial, and marine industries. To date, the company has a wide distribution network covering over 30 countries.

Source: United Global Limited Annual Report 2017

United Global Limited revenue has been moving in sideways in the past 5 years. Despite that, its bottom line growth has delivered spectacular results. From FY2013 to FY2017, the company’s revenue was hovering around USD 100 million.

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Top Ten Attributes of Great Fundamental Investors

Top Ten Attributes of Great Fundamental Investors

The Top Ten Attributes of Great Fundamental Investors by Michael J. Mauboussin.

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The following is an excerpt of the full report:

“Perhaps the single greatest error in the investment business is a failure to distinguish between the knowledge of a company’s fundamentals and the expectations implied by the market price.”

The world of investing and business has seen a great deal of change in the past 30 years.

This report shares thoughts on the ten attributes of great fundamental investors. Accounting is the language of business and you need to understand it to appreciate economic value and to assess competitive positioning. Investors face a slew of psychological challenges.

Perhaps the most difficult is updating beliefs when new information arrives. Position sizing and portfolio construction still do not get the attention they warrant. The substantial shift from active to passive management has profound implications for the investment industry.

I started on Wall Street 30 years ago today…”

Read the full report [PDF] here.

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Investing Is So Damn Tough You Are Right (Guest Post)

Investing Is So Damn Tough You Are Right (Guest Post)

This post was originally posted here. The writer is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as 3Fs.

To say that this has been a tough year for investment is an understatement.

Investing, as a general form of growing your wealth is so damn tough that for one not to be losing money is sometimes already seen as a form of success.

I can totally relate why many people avoided them like a plague because contrary to many popular beliefs, it can jolly well diminish your money.

Imagine yourself being invested in Asian Pay TV Trust at the start of the year, having intrigued by its stuttering share price and a high dividend payout.

You might have thought the dividends they pay out is unsustainable hence you made a decision to project them conservatively at the fcf you think they can give out.

When APTT announces their recent results, the management is even more conservative than you are and slashed their dividends like they did to slaughter a dying pig, causing its share price to fall by 50% in one day.

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The Art of War(chest): How To Achieve The Optimum Level Of Warchest To Achieve The Maximum Returns. (Guest Post)

The Art of War(chest): How To Achieve The Optimum Level Of Warchest To Achieve The Maximum Returns. (Guest Post)

This article, The Art of War(chest) was originally posted here. The writer is a veteran community member on InvestingNote, with username known as theintelligentinvestor.

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I have seen frequent discussions on the amount of cash we should be holding as warchest and opinions varied widely. Some are fearful of today high market in overseas markets and advocate for 100% cash, while others see good values in STI market and maintain a high percentage invested in the market. Questions asked are often the optimum level of warchest to achieve the maximum returns. I been thinking about this and want to pen down my thoughts.

One approach is to determine what is the expected value (EV) using the probability of an event happening. Then based on some reasonable assumptions to work out the two extreme cases of All Equity or All Cash.

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