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Singapore Savings Bonds SSB October 2020 Issue Yields 0.90% for 10 Year and 0.26% for 1 Year (Guest Post)

Singapore Savings Bonds SSB October 2020 Issue Yields 0.90% for 10 Year and 0.26% for 1 Year (Guest Post)

Here is a safe way to save your money that you have no idea when you will need to use it, or your emergency fund.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and has 1051  followers.

The 10-yr and 1-yr Singapore Savings Bonds Rate since the first issue in Oct 2015

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The Beauty of High Yield Bond Funds (Guest Post)

The Beauty of High Yield Bond Funds (Guest Post)

When it comes to bonds, many investors still believe in owning individual bonds till maturity. It feels more right in that firstly you do not suffer from capital losses if you held the bond to maturity and secondly you get predictable coupon returns that was promised to you at the start.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and has 1051  followers.

Unfortunately, the investors ran into some problems:

  1. They demanded a certain respectable interest yield on their bonds. If it is too low, they find that it is unattractive and would not go for it.
  2. They need to reinvest into another bond after the previous one matures. This maturity period may take place anytime.
  3. Prefers bonds in local currency
  4. For some, they might not have enough capital to diversify (traditionally the minimum you need to purchase bonds is $250,000)

With these requirements, what tends to happen is that these investors push themselves up the risk spectrum.

When they push themselves up the risk spectrum, they take on more geographical risk, currency risk, default risk, duration risk.

But in their mind, these bonds are as safe as a high quality government bonds.

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Singapore Savings Bonds SSB August 2020 Issue Yields 0.93% for 10 Year and 0.27% for 1 Year (Guest Post)

Singapore Savings Bonds SSB August 2020 Issue Yields 0.93% for 10 Year and 0.27% for 1 Year (Guest Post)

Here is a safe way to save your money that you have no idea when you will need to use it, or your emergency fund.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and has 1051  followers.

The 10-yr and 1-yr Singapore Savings Bonds Rate since the first issue in Oct 2015

The August 2020’s SSB bonds yield an interest rate of 0.93%/yr for the next 10 years. You can apply through ATM or Internet Banking via the three banks (UOB,OCBC, DBS)

However, if you only hold the SSB bonds for 1 year, with 2 semi-annual payments, your interest rate is 0.27%/yr.

$10,000 will grow to $10,946in 10 years.

This bond is backed by the Singapore Government and its available to Singaporeans.

A single person can own not more than SG$200,000 worth of Singapore Savings Bonds. You can also use your Supplementary Retirement Scheme (SRS) account to purchase.

 

You can find out more information about the SSB here.

Note that every month, there will be a new issue you can subscribe to via ATM. The 1 to 10-year yield you will get will differ from this month’s ladder as shown above.

Last month’s bond yields 0.80%/yr for 10 years and 0.30%/yr for 1 year.

Here is the current historical SSB 10 Year Yield Curve with the 1 Year Yield Curve since Oct 2015 when SSB was started (Click on the chart, move over the line to see the actual yield for that month):

The Application and Redemption Schedule

You will apply for the bonds through the month. At the end of the month, you will know how much of the bond you applied was successful.

Here is the schedule for application and redemption if you wish to sell:
Click to see larger schedule

You have 02 to about 25th of the month (technically the 4th day from the last working day of the month) to apply or decide to redeem the SSB that you wish to redeem.

Your bond will be in your CDP on the 1st of the next month. You will see your cash in your bank account linked to your CDP account on the 1st of next month.

How does the Singapore Savings Bonds Compare versus SGS Bonds versus Singapore Treasury Bills?

Singapore savings bonds is like a “unit trust” or a “fund” of SGS Bonds.

But what is the difference between you buying SGS Bonds and its sister the T-Bills directly?

Both the SGS Bonds and T-Bills are also issued by the Government and are AAA rated.

Here is an MAS detailed comparison of the three:
Click to see bigger comparison table

 

Once again, this article is a guest post and was originally posted on Kyiths profile on InvestingNote. 

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4 Ways A Retail Investor Can Get Access To Bonds In Singapore

4 Ways A Retail Investor Can Get Access To Bonds In Singapore

When it comes to investing, the first few things that come to investors’ mind are stocks or REITs. However, many investors tend to overlook or ignore bonds (fixed income securities) as an asset class.

bonds

What exactly are bonds?

Bonds represent debt obligations aka they are a form of borrowing. Bonds can be issued by the government or a company. Let’s say if a company issues a bond, the issuer owes the holders a debt and is obliged to them interest (also known as coupon payment) or to repay the principal at the maturity date. The interest payments are usually payable at fixed intervals – semi-annually, annually and sometimes monthly.

Note that in the event of liquidation (the process of ending a business and distributing its assets to claimants), bondholders will get the first priority in terms of getting paid, followed by unsecured creditors (suppliers, employees, banks and stockholders).

Generally, due to the nature of bonds, bonds are considered less risky than equities like stocks or REITs. That is also why bonds generally entail a lower return in relation to the risks.

Before you start investing in one, you have to familiarise yourself with the list of bonds available in the Singapore market that you can invest in:

1. Singapore Government Securities (SGS)

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