Browsed by
Tag: stocks

3 Key Points To Lookout For When Buying Stocks In A Recession (Guest Post)

3 Key Points To Lookout For When Buying Stocks In A Recession (Guest Post)

A recession is a significant decline in economic activity, lasting more than a few months. But many asked, when to buy stocks? How to better time a market entry in a recession? Well, here are 3 points to guide you along.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Royston Tan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Royston_Tan and has 22 followers.

A Looming Recession? Look at Interest Rates - WSJ

For those looking to time a market entry, some data points on when might be a good time.

WHEN TO BUY STOCKS IN A RECESSION? THE IDEAL TIME TO PICK A BOTTOM

While I don’t recommend trying to time stock purchases with a crystal ball in front of you, especially during a bear market potentially as severe as the one we are currently facing, I will provide some reference point as to when might be the IDEAL time to PICK a bottom and start investing more aggressively in a recession.

This is not going to be from my GUT but instead using historical statistics to time entry. YES, I know that historical performance is never representative of the future trajectory of the stock market, especially one that is seemingly unprecedented as the current one.

Then again, having some maths behind you beats randomly pulling out some FORECAST based on your gut.

Before I disclose “my formula” on when to buy stocks in a recession, the question I like to ask is: Are we already in a recession? Seems to be a no-brainer question especially with more than half the world being on lockdown, right?

WHAT DEFINES A RECESSION?

A recession is a significant decline in economic activity, lasting more than a few months. There is a drop in the following 5 economic indicators:

  1. Real Gross domestic product (GDP)
  2. Income
  3. Employment
  4. Manufacturing
  5. Retail Sales

The current situation seems to tick all the boxes in this category.

A “simpler” definition for a recession is when the GDP growth rate is negative for two consecutive quarters or more. While it might seem simple, there might be some confusion. Should we be measuring GDP growth on a YoY basis (ie compare 1Q20 to 1Q19) or should we be measuring it based on QoQ (ie comparing 1Q20 to 4Q19).

The latter comparing on a QoQ basis is often being termed as a “Technical Recession” within the Singapore context (If you type technical recession in Google, most of the results are related to Singapore).

HOW DOES THE US CALCULATE GDP GROWTH?

In the US, the Bureau of Economic Analysis uses real GDP to measure the US GDP growth rate. Real GDP takes out the effect of inflation. GDP is calculated every quarter but is being annualized. The aim of annualizing is to remove the effect of seasons. If the BEA did not do this, there will always be a spike in the 4Q growth rate due to the holiday seasons.

The BEA provides a formula for calculating the US GDP growth rate which I will not detail much in this article.

IS THE US ALREADY IN A RECESSION?

NEW YORK CITY TIMELAPSE (EMPTY AMERICA) — fullinsight

Depending on which article you read, some might say that the US is already in a recession while others such as this Bloomberg Tracker (last updated March 11) which pegs the probability at “only” 53%, still the highest level since GFC. However, that tracker was done before the jobless claims blew up over the past 2 weeks, now more than 10m, so I reckon that probability ratio will probably be inched up significantly in the next update.

Given the COVID-19 scenario that we are facing, whether we choose to look at GDP growth from a YoY or QoQ basis, it is difficult to argue against the fact that US GDP growth will be negative in 1Q20 and 2Q20.

Even if the COVID-19 issue miraculously resolves itself today, the uncertainty surrounding a possible relapse will result in nations all over the world engaging a protectionist stance that will stymie the global economic recovery process.

My best guess, if I am to look into my crystal ball is that the peak of the COVID-19 issue for developed nations such as US, Italy and Spain will probably be sometime in late-April to early-May by which the focus will then turn to developing nations such as India and Indonesia where cases are just beginning to ramp up.

Developed nations will continue to shut off their borders to foreigners for fear of a relapse, just like what China is currently doing. The V-shape recovery which many people are hoping for is probably not going to happen in such a scenario.

HOW BAD IS THIS RECESSION GOING TO BE?

Read More Read More

Why Did I Add UOB (SGX:U11) to My Long-Term Investment Portfolio (Guest Post)

Why Did I Add UOB (SGX:U11) to My Long-Term Investment Portfolio (Guest Post)

Some insights about UOB ’s historical financial performance, along with its dividend payouts to shareholders over the years and many more.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 797 followers.

 UOB launches high street branch model at Faber House targeting ...

Why Did I Add UOB (SGX:U11) to My Long-Term Investment Portfolio

With my investment in UOB (SGX:U11) on 06 March 2020 at my intended entry price of S$23.26 (based on this entry price, and a dividend payout of S$1.30/share in FY2019, my dividend yield is 5.6%), I now have all 3 Singapore banks, plus another financial institution in Hong Leong Finance (SGX:S41) in my long-term investment portfolio.

In my post today, I would like to share with you reasons why I’ve invested in the bank…

 

Brief Introduction to United Overseas Bank

Before I talk about the bank’s historical financial performance, along with its dividend payouts to shareholders over the years, let me first a quick introduction about the bank.

Besides Singapore, UOB has more than 500 branches and offices in 19 countries (Australia, Brunei, Canada, China, France, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom, United States of America, and Vietnam.)

 

Historical Financial Performance of UOB over the Past 10 Years

Before I put my hard-earned money into any company, I will need to make sure the company fulfils some criteria – one of which is an improving set of financial results reported by the company over the years.

In this section, I will be sharing some of the key financial statistics reported by UOB over a period of 10 years (between FY2010 and FY2019):

Net Interest Income, Net Fee & Commission Income, and Other Non-Interest Income:

UOB’s “Total Income” comprises of 3 business components – (i) Net Interest Income, (ii) Net Fee & Commission Income, and (iii) Other Non-Interest Income.

Let us now take a look at the performances of these 3 business components between FY2010 and FY2019:

Read More Read More

Koufu Limited (SGX:VL6) – My Analysis of the F&B Company (Guest Post)

Koufu Limited (SGX:VL6) – My Analysis of the F&B Company (Guest Post)

Some insights for Koufu business, its financial results between FY2018 and FY2019, dividend payout history, catalysts and threats which I feel may positively or negatively affect the company’s growth ahead, and finally, its current vs. historical valuations.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 797 followers.

Photos for Cookhouse by Koufu - Yelp

I have received a number of requests from fellow community members in InvestingNote over the past couple of months asking me to do a company analysis of Koufu Limited (SGX:VL6).

In my writeup about the F&B company today, you’ll learn more about the companies businesses, its financial results between FY2018 and FY2019, dividend payout history, catalysts and threats which I feel may positively or negatively affect the company’s growth ahead, and finally, its current vs. historical valuations to find out whether or not at its current share price, Koufu is considered cheap or expensive.

Let’s get started…

A Brief Introduction to Koufu Limited

Koufu is a brand familiar to Singaporeans – the company operates foodcourts/coffeeshops under its namesake brand. At the time of writing, there are a total of 37 Koufu foodcourts in Singapore.

Apart from its namesake foodcourts, the company also operates foodcourts/coffeeshops under the following brand names (with the number of outlets at the time of writing in brackets):

  • Cookhouse by Koufu (5 outlets)
  • Rasapura Masters (1 outlet)
  • Fork & Spoon (2 outlets)
  • Happy Hawkers (18 outlets)
  • Gourmet Paradise (2 outlets)

The company has also businesses in the following:

F&B Kiosks & Stalls:

  • R&B Tea (27 outlets)
  • 1983 – A Taste of Nanyang (3 outlets)
  • Supertea (1 outlet)

Cafes & Restaurants:

  • 1983 – Coffee & Toast (3 outlets)
  • elemen 元素 (4 outlets)
  • Grove 元素 (1 outlet)

Shopping Mall:

  • Punggol Plaza – a 4-storey development comprising about 50 retail outlets. The mall is managed by Abundance Development Pte Ltd, a subsidiary of Koufu Pte Ltd

Overseas:

Besides Singapore, Koufu also have business operations in Malaysia and Macau, where they operate under the following brand names (with the number of outlets at the time of writing in brackets):

  • 1983 – A Taste of Nanyang (2 outlets in Macau)
  • Koufu (2 outlets in Macau)
  • R&B Tea (1 outlet in Malaysia, 1 outlet in Macau)

 

Financial Performance of Koufu Ltd between FY2018 and FY2019

Read More Read More

The Hammer Candlestick Trading Strategy Guide (Guest post)

The Hammer Candlestick Trading Strategy Guide (Guest post)

The Hammer candlestick pattern is a powerful entry trigger. If you were to trade it, your stop loss is at least the range of the Hammer (or more). But won’t it be great if you can reduce the size of your stop loss and improve your risk to reward?

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Rayner Teo is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Rayner and has 310 followers.

According to most textbooks:

Whenever you spot a Hammer candlestick pattern, you should go long because the market is about to reverse higher.

And that’s what you do.

But the next thing you know…

The price immediately reverses and you get stopped out for a loss.

And you wonder to yourself:

“Wait a minute, isn’t a Hammer candlestick a bullish signal?

“Why did the market reverse against me?”

“What’s going on?”

Well, let me tell you a secret…

A Hammer candlestick pattern doesn’t mean jackshit (and I’ll explain why later).

But first, let’s understand what a Hammer candlestick pattern is about…

What is a Hammer candlestick pattern?

A Hammer is a (1- candle) bullish reversal pattern that forms after a decline in price.

Here’s how to recognize it:

  • Little to no upper shadow
  • The price closes at the top ¼ of the range
  • The lower shadow is about 2 or 3 times the length of the body

And this is what a Hammer means…

  1. When the market opens, the sellers took control and pushed price lower
  2. At the selling climax, huge buying pressure stepped in and pushed price higher
  3. The buying pressure is so strong that it closed above the opening price

In short, a hammer is a bullish candlestick reversal candlestick pattern that shows rejection of lower prices.

Now, this is important.

Just because you see a Hammer candlestick doesn’t mean you go long immediately.

Here’s why…

The truth about Hammer candlestick (that most gurus don’t even know)

Are you ready?

Here you go…

  1. A Hammer is usually a retracement against the trend
  2. The Hammer doesn’t tell you the direction of the trend
  3. The context of the market is more important than the Hammer

Let me explain…

Read More Read More

Singapore Airlines Ltd (SGX: C6L) Is In Deep Trouble And Rights Issue Call Is Imminent (Guest Post)

Singapore Airlines Ltd (SGX: C6L) Is In Deep Trouble And Rights Issue Call Is Imminent (Guest Post)

The Covid-19 situation has hit the aviation industry really hard and in particular the airlines, SIA, since they are highly capitalized business which needs constant cashflow to fund their operating costs, capex and fixed costs. In the scenario where they have to cut capacity like where we are in this situation now, the company may be able to “save” on their operating costs since they do not have to incur charges like handling and ground charges that are related to the operating business.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Brian Halim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as 3Fs and 2068+ followers.

Image result for sg airline

Singapore Airlines Ltd (SGX: C6L) Is In Deep Shit And Rights Issue Call Is Imminent

The Covid-19 situation has hit the aviation industry really hard and in particular the airlines since they are highly capitalized business which needs constant cashflow to fund their operating costs, capex and fixed costs.

In the scenario where they have to cut capacity like where we are in this situation now, the company may be able to “save” on their operating costs since they do not have to incur charges like handling and ground charges that are related to the operating business.

But, they do have to continue paying for parking charges to the airport, levies as well as fixed costs such as salaries and rental that will continue to bleed the business.

Cashflow Simulation Run
I’ve run a simulation run where the left hand side shows their latest Q3 results for the year ending 31 Dec 2019, while the middle portion reflects what the situation is today. On the right side, I’ve accounted for movement that is related to cashflow, so things like depreciation is taken out of context because they are non-cashflow related items.

The middle portion reflects the current scenario we have today.

For example, the topline sees a 95% capacity cut which was announced just a few days ago since Singapore is on semi-lockdown situation. Consequently, I’ve adjusted the same for operating costs related such as fuel, inflight meals and handling charges.

For staff costs, I’ve used a 20% haircut across the payroll while for other fixed costs I’ve taken a 50% haircut.

The resulting loss coming in from this simulation is a negative $(1,998m) for the quarter. If we divide this by months, it means incurring a net loss of $(666m) / month.

What this means from a cashflow point of view is that should the situation prevails, the company is burning approximately $1,461m in cash every quarter, or $487m every month.

Now, this might look okay if you are in a good standing order in terms of your balance sheet but let’s see what they have today.

Read More Read More

Top 4 Reasons You Should Not Panic As An Investor (Guest Post)

Top 4 Reasons You Should Not Panic As An Investor (Guest Post)

I know your portfolio is in a deep sea of red, but what I want to tell you is this – you’re not alone. Many investors are also suffering from a huge unrealised loss in their portfolio, myself included (as at time of writing, my long-term investment portfolio is down by 20.0%.) And in case you might be thinking I am a “veteran” in investing, I only have about 2+ years of experience as a full-time retail investor, and is my first time I’m experiencing a stock market decline like this.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 736 followers.

 

On Monday evening (16 March 2020), Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin announced the lockdown of Malaysia for a period of 14 days (from 18 March to 31 March) in a bid to stem the further spread of Covid-19 in the country.

Almost immediately, I read about news of fellow Singaporeans rushing to the supermarkets (even though its already late into the evening) to sweep them clean of fresh produces out of panic that supplies in Singapore may be cut as a result of the lockdown in Malaysia (as many of our fresh produces are imported from the country.)

I see some parallels happening in the stock market as well, especially over the past two weeks, where I see many investors emptying their portfolios and rushing for the exit doors out of fear.

I know your portfolio is in a deep sea of red, but what I want to tell you is this – you’re not alone. Many investors are also suffering from a huge unrealised loss in their portfolio, myself included (as at time of writing, my long-term investment portfolio is down by 20.0%.) And in case you might be thinking I am a “veteran” in investing, I only have about 2+ years of experience as a full-time retail investor, and this is the first time I’m experiencing a stock market decline like this (I hope that after hearing this, it makes you feel better.)

Before you make any rash decisions, I suggest you calm yourself down, and ask yourself the following 4 questions:

1. Why are You Investing in the First Place?

Image result for investing

I’d like you to recall the moment you make the commitment to invest – why did you make the decision?

Some may decide to invest because they want to build a high yielding portfolio (with yields higher than their CPF Special Account), some may be more focused on the eventual capital gain they could possibly get from their investments, while for some, it may be a mixture of both.

So, which group do you belong to?

 

2. Why did You Choose to Invest in those Companies in Your Current Portfolio?

I certainly hope your answer to this question is not, “because of hearsay.”

Prior to investing your hard-earned money in a company, I really hope that you have done a thorough research about it, and have a good knowledge of the company’s businesses, financials, debt profile, dividend payouts, etc. well enough before you make the eventual decision to invest in it.

Read More Read More

Trading Profitably In Extremely Volatile Market Conditions [LIVE WEBINAR]

Trading Profitably In Extremely Volatile Market Conditions [LIVE WEBINAR]

Stock markets around the globe are tumbling.

Here’s how much the S&P 500 dropped since 2 months ago:screen-shot-2020-03-16-at-5-08-09-pm

The STI is also not spared:

screen-shot-2020-03-16-at-5-06-14-pm

Did it look obvious enough that the markets would’ve plunged so much?

Or did the thought of catching the bottom crossed your mind more than once?

If either or both these thoughts have ever crossed your mind, you’re not alone.

What if there was a systematic way of approaching the markets?

To help you with that, we’ve veteran trader Collin Seow, an ex top-tier remisier in Phillip Securities for 12 years, a qualified Chartered Portfolio Manager (CPM) holding a Certified Financial Technician (CFTe) qualification and a member of MENSA Singapore, who will show you how he is Trading Profitably In Extremely Volatile Market Conditions.

collin

In this 2 hour LIVE webinar, Collin Seow will be covering on the 3 immensely powerful combination strategies that you can use immediately, especially during such volatile markets:
✔ Swing Trade Strategy
✔ GMMA Strategy
✔ The K-Wave Indicator

Also, engage in Q&A with Collin during this exclusive live webinar.

Attend anywhere from the comforts of your own home or office.

The full recording of this entire webinar will also be given to you.

Date & Time: Wednesday March 25th, 2020, 7:00 – 9.00PM
Venue: Watch Online

button_register-here


InvestingNote is the first and largest social network for investors in Singapore. Find out more about us here.

Download our free app here:

apple   android

CoronaVirus Epidemic: How Far Is The Impact on Stock Markets?

CoronaVirus Epidemic: How Far Is The Impact on Stock Markets?

The CoronaVirus that originated from Wuhan has just been declared a global health emergency by WHO. The global death toll and confirmed cases are mounting.

 

As of 7th February Friday morning, number of confirmed cases globally surpassed 30,000.

The number of cases in China grew by 3,143 (11%), on the previous day.

An infographic by The Business Times measures the impact of the virus statistically:

nswuhan3 copy

We asked some of our veteran traders and investors and this is what they have to say:

William Liu & Robin Han‘s take (presented in mandarin):

ValueInvestAsia & Li Guang Sheng‘s take:

Brennen Pak‘s take:

screen-shot-2020-02-03-at-11-18-10-am

Stay safe everyone!

Become a part of our community and also see what other investors are saying about the current market right now: (click on the view now button)

button_view-now


InvestingNote is the first and largest social network for investors in Singapore. Find out more about us here.

Download our free app here:

apple   android

Upcoming Workshop: Applying The Multiple Time Frame Analysis To Stocks

Upcoming Workshop: Applying The Multiple Time Frame Analysis To Stocks

What Is Multiple Time-Frame Analysis?

Multiple time-frame analysis involves monitoring the same currency pair across different frequencies (or time compressions). While there is no real limit as to how many frequencies can be monitored or which specific ones to choose, there are general guidelines that most practitioners will follow.

Typically, using three different periods gives a broad enough reading on the market, while using fewer than this can result in a considerable loss of data, and using more typically provides redundant analysis. When choosing the three time frequencies, a simple strategy can be to follow a “rule of four.” This means that a medium-term period should first be determined and it should represent a standard as to how long the average trade is held. From there, a shorter term time frame should be chosen and it should be at least one-fourth the intermediate period (for example, a 15-minute chart for the short-term time frame and 60-minute chart for the medium or intermediate time frame). Through the same calculation, the long-term time frame should be at least four times greater than the intermediate one (so, keeping with the previous example, the 240-minute or four-hour chart would round out the three time frequencies).

This method can also work for the stock market, and this technical analysis workshop for intermediate traders will show you how.

mfta

In this workshop, you’ll learn about:
✔ Understanding the types of markets and how it impacts your strategies
✔ Incorporating different timeframes into your trading to maximise your trades
✔ The one most important thing that professionals use to test their and verify their strategies
✔ How to utilise two simple technical analysis tools effectively that usually outperform complicated tools
✔ Habits and daily regimes of successful traders that every trader needs to know and follow

There will also be live chart trading examples to highlight the importance of multiple time frame analysis, that can be applied for the stock market.

You can look forward to upgrade your trading skillset in this 3-hour workshop on 2 Nov, Saturday 10am – 2pm.

This exclusive event is free to attend and sponsored by City Index.

Register now, come later! 

button_register-here


InvestingNote is the first and largest social network for investors in Singapore. Find out more about us here.

Download our free app here:

apple   android

The 6 Stocks Which Grew More Than 5% In Price In A Month

The 6 Stocks Which Grew More Than 5% In Price In A Month

With the trade talk between China and US being resumed after the G20, both Singapore and HK markets rallied big time. It’s time to spot some potential stocks!

Image result for g20

Let’s look at 3 Hong Kong stocks that have caught the public’s eye:

According to Reuters, on  27th June Shares in Hong Kong rose on Thursday, extending the previous day’s cautious gains, as investors’ hopes of a trade truce between the United States and China rose ahead of a highly anticipated meeting between the countries’ leaders. At the close of trade, the Hang Seng index was up 399.44 points or 1.42% at 28,621.42, adding to the previous day’s 0.1% gain.

The top gainer on the Hang Seng was Sunny Optical (2382 HK)-mainland China’s largest manufacturer of smartphone camera modules and lenses which gained 4.03%. Sunny Optical is also up by at least 20% within a month. If you have a 5x leverage, it would be more than 100% gain!

screen-shot-2019-07-05-at-3-47-35-pm

Besides Sunny Optical Technology Group Co Ltd, AAC Technologies (2018 HK)-acoustic components supplier to Apple Inc also rose 7.1 per cent to HK$47.50 as reported by South China Morning Post. It has also risen more than 10% within a month. If you have a 5x leverage, it amounts to more than 50% gain!

Read More Read More