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Trump’s Trade War and His Twitter “Gauntlet”

Trump’s Trade War and His Twitter “Gauntlet”

The Trade War has escalated once again.

Yes, you guessed it right.

All by the SNAP of Trump’s fingers.

trump-trade-war

On Sunday the US president decided to snap his fingers and tweeted that tariffs of 10% on certain goods would rise to 25% on Friday, and $325bn of untaxed goods could face 25% duties “shortly”.

This has caused both US and Chinese stock markets to dive.

For months, investors and companies had been lulled into a sense of security that the world’s two largest economies appeared to be getting closer to a deal to resolve their battle.

That calm was utterly shattered this week.

How’s it all going to affect you? Yes YOU, the diligent Singaporean retail investor.

This is a serious, volatile and gloomy time for all investors.

Join us at this exclusive event to find out what Top traders think on Thursday, 16th May 2019, 7 – 9pm.

atc-gathering

Here’s what to expect:
Are we turning into a bear market? The special case of an STI component stock
Singapore, Hang Seng Market Outlook
Thinking like The Big Boys: Using Game Theory in Daily Trading
Fibonnaci Levels in Trading: What Can Numbers Show

Strategising a Trade Plan
Panel Discussion: What’s Interesting To Trade For the Month Of May? How will stocks move forward?

Time, tide and the Trade war waits for no man.

Limited seats only. But feel free to bring a friend along.

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Exclusively for Active Traders’ Clubs members only.

Join the Club now  https://www.investingnote.com/groups/42

Trade Tariffs Hit Asian and US Stock Markets Badly

Trade Tariffs Hit Asian and US Stock Markets Badly

But first, what are trade tariffs?

A tariff is basically a tax paid on imports and exports of goods and services.

An imposing tax on an imported product would cause its price to increase, which results in a decrease in demand for imported goods. In relation, the price of local products becomes lower to the consumer.

The US Total Imports vs Dutiable Imports from 1821 to 2016 can be seen below:

The current US deficit as of 2017 is $500 billion. The US imports from China about four times as much as it sells to that country in goods as services, leaving Washington more room than Beijing to tax a greater share of bilateral trade. The U.S. trade deficit with China was $375 billion in 2017. The trade deficit exists because U.S. exports to China were only $130 billion while imports from China were $506 billion. The United States imports consumer electronics, clothing, and machinery from China. A lot of the imports are from U.S. manufacturers that send raw materials to China for low-cost assembly. Once shipped back to the United States, they are considered imports.

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