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3 Key Points To Lookout For When Buying Stocks In A Recession (Guest Post)

3 Key Points To Lookout For When Buying Stocks In A Recession (Guest Post)

A recession is a significant decline in economic activity, lasting more than a few months. But many asked, when to buy stocks? How to better time a market entry in a recession? Well, here are 3 points to guide you along.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Royston Tan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Royston_Tan and has 22 followers.

A Looming Recession? Look at Interest Rates - WSJ

For those looking to time a market entry, some data points on when might be a good time.

WHEN TO BUY STOCKS IN A RECESSION? THE IDEAL TIME TO PICK A BOTTOM

While I don’t recommend trying to time stock purchases with a crystal ball in front of you, especially during a bear market potentially as severe as the one we are currently facing, I will provide some reference point as to when might be the IDEAL time to PICK a bottom and start investing more aggressively in a recession.

This is not going to be from my GUT but instead using historical statistics to time entry. YES, I know that historical performance is never representative of the future trajectory of the stock market, especially one that is seemingly unprecedented as the current one.

Then again, having some maths behind you beats randomly pulling out some FORECAST based on your gut.

Before I disclose “my formula” on when to buy stocks in a recession, the question I like to ask is: Are we already in a recession? Seems to be a no-brainer question especially with more than half the world being on lockdown, right?

WHAT DEFINES A RECESSION?

A recession is a significant decline in economic activity, lasting more than a few months. There is a drop in the following 5 economic indicators:

  1. Real Gross domestic product (GDP)
  2. Income
  3. Employment
  4. Manufacturing
  5. Retail Sales

The current situation seems to tick all the boxes in this category.

A “simpler” definition for a recession is when the GDP growth rate is negative for two consecutive quarters or more. While it might seem simple, there might be some confusion. Should we be measuring GDP growth on a YoY basis (ie compare 1Q20 to 1Q19) or should we be measuring it based on QoQ (ie comparing 1Q20 to 4Q19).

The latter comparing on a QoQ basis is often being termed as a “Technical Recession” within the Singapore context (If you type technical recession in Google, most of the results are related to Singapore).

HOW DOES THE US CALCULATE GDP GROWTH?

In the US, the Bureau of Economic Analysis uses real GDP to measure the US GDP growth rate. Real GDP takes out the effect of inflation. GDP is calculated every quarter but is being annualized. The aim of annualizing is to remove the effect of seasons. If the BEA did not do this, there will always be a spike in the 4Q growth rate due to the holiday seasons.

The BEA provides a formula for calculating the US GDP growth rate which I will not detail much in this article.

IS THE US ALREADY IN A RECESSION?

NEW YORK CITY TIMELAPSE (EMPTY AMERICA) — fullinsight

Depending on which article you read, some might say that the US is already in a recession while others such as this Bloomberg Tracker (last updated March 11) which pegs the probability at “only” 53%, still the highest level since GFC. However, that tracker was done before the jobless claims blew up over the past 2 weeks, now more than 10m, so I reckon that probability ratio will probably be inched up significantly in the next update.

Given the COVID-19 scenario that we are facing, whether we choose to look at GDP growth from a YoY or QoQ basis, it is difficult to argue against the fact that US GDP growth will be negative in 1Q20 and 2Q20.

Even if the COVID-19 issue miraculously resolves itself today, the uncertainty surrounding a possible relapse will result in nations all over the world engaging a protectionist stance that will stymie the global economic recovery process.

My best guess, if I am to look into my crystal ball is that the peak of the COVID-19 issue for developed nations such as US, Italy and Spain will probably be sometime in late-April to early-May by which the focus will then turn to developing nations such as India and Indonesia where cases are just beginning to ramp up.

Developed nations will continue to shut off their borders to foreigners for fear of a relapse, just like what China is currently doing. The V-shape recovery which many people are hoping for is probably not going to happen in such a scenario.

HOW BAD IS THIS RECESSION GOING TO BE?

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Why Did I Add UOB (SGX:U11) to My Long-Term Investment Portfolio (Guest Post)

Why Did I Add UOB (SGX:U11) to My Long-Term Investment Portfolio (Guest Post)

Some insights about UOB ’s historical financial performance, along with its dividend payouts to shareholders over the years and many more.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 797 followers.

 UOB launches high street branch model at Faber House targeting ...

Why Did I Add UOB (SGX:U11) to My Long-Term Investment Portfolio

With my investment in UOB (SGX:U11) on 06 March 2020 at my intended entry price of S$23.26 (based on this entry price, and a dividend payout of S$1.30/share in FY2019, my dividend yield is 5.6%), I now have all 3 Singapore banks, plus another financial institution in Hong Leong Finance (SGX:S41) in my long-term investment portfolio.

In my post today, I would like to share with you reasons why I’ve invested in the bank…

 

Brief Introduction to United Overseas Bank

Before I talk about the bank’s historical financial performance, along with its dividend payouts to shareholders over the years, let me first a quick introduction about the bank.

Besides Singapore, UOB has more than 500 branches and offices in 19 countries (Australia, Brunei, Canada, China, France, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom, United States of America, and Vietnam.)

 

Historical Financial Performance of UOB over the Past 10 Years

Before I put my hard-earned money into any company, I will need to make sure the company fulfils some criteria – one of which is an improving set of financial results reported by the company over the years.

In this section, I will be sharing some of the key financial statistics reported by UOB over a period of 10 years (between FY2010 and FY2019):

Net Interest Income, Net Fee & Commission Income, and Other Non-Interest Income:

UOB’s “Total Income” comprises of 3 business components – (i) Net Interest Income, (ii) Net Fee & Commission Income, and (iii) Other Non-Interest Income.

Let us now take a look at the performances of these 3 business components between FY2010 and FY2019:

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Koufu Limited (SGX:VL6) – My Analysis of the F&B Company (Guest Post)

Koufu Limited (SGX:VL6) – My Analysis of the F&B Company (Guest Post)

Some insights for Koufu business, its financial results between FY2018 and FY2019, dividend payout history, catalysts and threats which I feel may positively or negatively affect the company’s growth ahead, and finally, its current vs. historical valuations.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 797 followers.

Photos for Cookhouse by Koufu - Yelp

I have received a number of requests from fellow community members in InvestingNote over the past couple of months asking me to do a company analysis of Koufu Limited (SGX:VL6).

In my writeup about the F&B company today, you’ll learn more about the companies businesses, its financial results between FY2018 and FY2019, dividend payout history, catalysts and threats which I feel may positively or negatively affect the company’s growth ahead, and finally, its current vs. historical valuations to find out whether or not at its current share price, Koufu is considered cheap or expensive.

Let’s get started…

A Brief Introduction to Koufu Limited

Koufu is a brand familiar to Singaporeans – the company operates foodcourts/coffeeshops under its namesake brand. At the time of writing, there are a total of 37 Koufu foodcourts in Singapore.

Apart from its namesake foodcourts, the company also operates foodcourts/coffeeshops under the following brand names (with the number of outlets at the time of writing in brackets):

  • Cookhouse by Koufu (5 outlets)
  • Rasapura Masters (1 outlet)
  • Fork & Spoon (2 outlets)
  • Happy Hawkers (18 outlets)
  • Gourmet Paradise (2 outlets)

The company has also businesses in the following:

F&B Kiosks & Stalls:

  • R&B Tea (27 outlets)
  • 1983 – A Taste of Nanyang (3 outlets)
  • Supertea (1 outlet)

Cafes & Restaurants:

  • 1983 – Coffee & Toast (3 outlets)
  • elemen 元素 (4 outlets)
  • Grove 元素 (1 outlet)

Shopping Mall:

  • Punggol Plaza – a 4-storey development comprising about 50 retail outlets. The mall is managed by Abundance Development Pte Ltd, a subsidiary of Koufu Pte Ltd

Overseas:

Besides Singapore, Koufu also have business operations in Malaysia and Macau, where they operate under the following brand names (with the number of outlets at the time of writing in brackets):

  • 1983 – A Taste of Nanyang (2 outlets in Macau)
  • Koufu (2 outlets in Macau)
  • R&B Tea (1 outlet in Malaysia, 1 outlet in Macau)

 

Financial Performance of Koufu Ltd between FY2018 and FY2019

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A Look into the Possible Share Price Movements of Singapore’s Blue Chip Companies in the Week Ahead (30 Mar – 03 Apr 2020) [Guest Post]

A Look into the Possible Share Price Movements of Singapore’s Blue Chip Companies in the Week Ahead (30 Mar – 03 Apr 2020) [Guest Post]

During the course of last week, the STI fell to a low of 2,208 points, before rebounding up strongly to finish the week at 2,528 points. In my opinion, in order for the trend to be considered as reversed (i.e. from a downtrend to an uptrend), it must close above 2,560 points when trading for the week closes this Friday (i.e. 03 April.) Otherwise, in my opinion, the overall trend is still a downward one.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 772 followers.

The share prices of quite a number of blue chip companies rebounded last week – but in my opinion, the trend is still a bearish one.

Before I proceed to analyse the share price movements of each of the 30 blue chip companies last week, and possible movements in the week ahead (for the trading week between 30 March and 03 April 2020) based on a weekly timeframe, here’s the share price movement of the STI on a weekly timeframe:
STI’s Movements on a Weekly Timeframe

During the course of last week, the STI fell to a low of 2,208 points, before rebounding up strongly to finish the week at 2,528 points. In my opinion, in order for the trend to be considered as reversed (i.e. from a downtrend to an uptrend), it must close above 2,560 points when trading for the week closes this Friday (i.e. 03 April.) Otherwise, in my opinion, the overall trend is still a downward one.

Now, let us take a look at how each of the 30 blue chip companies performed last week, and how they are likely to perform in the week ahead:

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Updates from Manulife US REIT & Prime US REIT (Guest Post)

Updates from Manulife US REIT & Prime US REIT (Guest Post)

Most of the REIT investors endure some extreme volatility in this March Madness. Their holdings have quite a good run in 2019.Coming into 2020, investors believe that the low rate environment is here to stay. Even when the threat of Covid-19 reaching the United States and Europe, investors rationalize that when the interest rate plunge, this must be a more conducive environment for the REITs. What comes next is that in a span of 2 weeks, many REITs saw their stock prices plunge 50%.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and has 954  followers.

Most of the REIT investors endure some extreme volatility in this March Madness. Their holdings have quite a good run in 2019.

Coming into 2020, investors believe that the low rate environment is here to stay. Even when the threat of Covid-19 reaching the United States and Europe, investors rationalize that when the interest rate plunge, this must be a more conducive environment for the REITs.

What comes next is that in a span of 2 weeks, many REITs saw their stock prices plunge 50%.

Manulife US REIT and Prime US REIT both endure the same fate as their peers.

In the past 2 days, both REITs provided some updates to analysts, so as to address the potential uncertainties of investors.

Since then both REITs saw their share price go up 20-25%. Manulife’s share price held up better, probably because they are in the Index and are much more liquid.

Their transparency may have worked wonders for their share price. However, overall, a lot of the REITs managed to bounce off their lows.

Here are some updates that I have gathered.

 

Possible Reasons for the Sharp Price Falls

Management updated that possible reasons why the draw down was so swift was due to

  1. Manulife’s entry into the index. When index funds, exchange-traded funds systematically sell down, there isn’t many fundamentals per se
  2. There was a lot of margin calls from the Private Banks (my friend KK from RisknReturns mentioned a few days ago that the three US Office REITs may have been removed from the list of marginable stocks on private banks)
  3. Funds redeeming and switching around. They are switching from smaller stocks to more liquid stocks
  4. Ultra-rich Chinese are facing heavy margin calls (we can guess who they are). Manulife US REIT does not have them on their register

 

Are Manulife US REIT’s Properties Affected?

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How COVID-19 Had Impacted SMEs, Startups And Our Daily Lifestyle (Guest Posts)

How COVID-19 Had Impacted SMEs, Startups And Our Daily Lifestyle (Guest Posts)

The unique thing about this problem,the COVID-19 is that commerce came to a screeching halt. In other crises, the problem was a lack of liquidity. Banks could not lend and small and large firms have to tighten their belt. Those who cannot will default and this ends up as non-performing loans on the balance sheet of banks. Increasing unemployment rates.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and has 953  followers.

Image result for bakeries closing ntice on doors

What we are going to talk about today is on SMEs, Lack of Financial Slack, Re-calibration of Risk, Priority in Life and Impact to Blogging

The Little Shops Are Going to Suffer

The unique thing about this problem is that commerce came to a screeching halt.

In other crises, the problem was a lack of liquidity. Banks could not lend and small and large firms have to tighten their belt. Those who cannot will default and this ends up as non-performing loans on the balance sheet of banks. There are more unemployed. Providing liquidity to the banks lubricates commerce.

The shit thing about what we are facing now is that you can provide all the liquidity to you to facilitate spending, but if you cannot go out and carry out some services, it is very tough to lubricate.

The world comes to a standstill for a while because the manufacturing base of the world, China, couldn’t function. Your company does not have spare parts, and therefore cannot ship.

Now that they can ship, the demand drops off because other countries are on locked down. Commerce comes to a halt.

What kind of crisis does this other than the great depression?

The toughest folks are the small and medium-sized companies. They usually depend on their peers or the big companies to give them business. A hit in demand on a wide scale hurts them the most.

My friend Caveman said the working capital for these firms is usually very challenging. The government’s main support package’s job is to ensure that these companies do not fire their workers but sometimes you wonder whether they have operated a small business before.

JD Roth over at Get Rich Slowly has a good piece asking how Coronavirus has affected your life. I like that he explores a lot of the impact on his recreational and financial life.

But what captures my attention was his description of his friend’s experience:

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Singapore Airlines Ltd (SGX: C6L) Is In Deep Trouble And Rights Issue Call Is Imminent (Guest Post)

Singapore Airlines Ltd (SGX: C6L) Is In Deep Trouble And Rights Issue Call Is Imminent (Guest Post)

The Covid-19 situation has hit the aviation industry really hard and in particular the airlines, SIA, since they are highly capitalized business which needs constant cashflow to fund their operating costs, capex and fixed costs. In the scenario where they have to cut capacity like where we are in this situation now, the company may be able to “save” on their operating costs since they do not have to incur charges like handling and ground charges that are related to the operating business.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Brian Halim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as 3Fs and 2068+ followers.

Image result for sg airline

Singapore Airlines Ltd (SGX: C6L) Is In Deep Shit And Rights Issue Call Is Imminent

The Covid-19 situation has hit the aviation industry really hard and in particular the airlines since they are highly capitalized business which needs constant cashflow to fund their operating costs, capex and fixed costs.

In the scenario where they have to cut capacity like where we are in this situation now, the company may be able to “save” on their operating costs since they do not have to incur charges like handling and ground charges that are related to the operating business.

But, they do have to continue paying for parking charges to the airport, levies as well as fixed costs such as salaries and rental that will continue to bleed the business.

Cashflow Simulation Run
I’ve run a simulation run where the left hand side shows their latest Q3 results for the year ending 31 Dec 2019, while the middle portion reflects what the situation is today. On the right side, I’ve accounted for movement that is related to cashflow, so things like depreciation is taken out of context because they are non-cashflow related items.

The middle portion reflects the current scenario we have today.

For example, the topline sees a 95% capacity cut which was announced just a few days ago since Singapore is on semi-lockdown situation. Consequently, I’ve adjusted the same for operating costs related such as fuel, inflight meals and handling charges.

For staff costs, I’ve used a 20% haircut across the payroll while for other fixed costs I’ve taken a 50% haircut.

The resulting loss coming in from this simulation is a negative $(1,998m) for the quarter. If we divide this by months, it means incurring a net loss of $(666m) / month.

What this means from a cashflow point of view is that should the situation prevails, the company is burning approximately $1,461m in cash every quarter, or $487m every month.

Now, this might look okay if you are in a good standing order in terms of your balance sheet but let’s see what they have today.

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Thoughts On CK Hutchison Holdings 2019 Results (Guest Post)

Thoughts On CK Hutchison Holdings 2019 Results (Guest Post)

2019 was a pretty challenging year by all standards. Being listed in Hong Kong, investors were concern about the impact of Hong Kong Riots on results. Since they have enough assets in Europe, a region which many believe is declining, they were concern about how Brexit impacts them. The declining in Euro and GBP, trade war between the United States vs China and Europe and also in recent times, it is Covid-19 and the plunge in oil prices will impact them.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Kyith and has 953 followers.

 

In terms of investments, CK Hutchison (0001.HK…) will probably go down as one of my poorer investments.

I got it at $85.90, $87.65, $81.25, $80.60, $82.90, $76.40, $67.90, $55.45. Based on cost, this is one of my largest position. It may go down as one of my biggest mistakes.

CK Hutchison or CKH for short is the listed flagship company of Li Kar Shing. In 2018, he step down from the company, handing the reins over to his eldest son Victor Li.

Victor Li manages CKH together with the best-paid employee in Hong Kong Canning Fok and Frank SIXT.

CKH this week together with their sister companies CKI, CKA, and Power Assets announced their full-year results.

In terms of key metrics this is how it lines up:

  1. Share price: HK$49.60
  2. Total outstanding shares: 3.8 billion
  3. Total market capitalisation: HK$188.5 billion
  4. Enterprise Value: HK$395.5 billion
  5. Net earnings attributable to shareholders: HK$39.9 billion (2018: HK$39 billion)
  6. Free cash flow: HK$35.7 billion (2018: HK$24.7 billion)
  7. Earnings Yield: 21%
  8. FCF Yield: 18.9%
  9. Dividend per Share: HK$3.17 (2018: HK$3.17)
  10. Prevailing dividend yield: 6.39%
  11. Dividend Payout Ratio: 30%
  12. Net Debt to Asset: 19.3%
  13. EV/EBITDA: 3.53 times
  14. Price / Equity (net of non-controlling interests): 0.40 times.

 

Why a Post on CKH Matters

On paper, you do not wish to hear me talk about one of possibly my big investment failures. But I thought the results are applicable in the context of what we are going through today.

CKH operations happens to be global:

  1. Ports in China, Hong Kong, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, UK, Spain, Poland, Sweden, Malaysia, Indonesia, South Korea, Thailand, Pakistan, Thailand, Australia, Egypt, Oman, UAE
  2. Retail Beauty & Health stores through AS Watson, ParknShop, Rossman, Drogas in Albania, Belgium, Czech, Germany, HK, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Latvia, Macau, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, UK, Vietnam
  3. Infrastructure through CKI in Australia, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Mainland China, The Netherlands, New Zealand, UK, Portugal.
  4. Energy in Canada through Husky Oil
  5. Telecommunications in the UK, Italy, Sweden, Denmark, Austria, Ireland, CKH Networks, Indonesia,

2019 is a pretty challenging year by all standards. Being listed in Hong Kong, investors were concern about the impact of Hong Kong Riots on results. Since they have enough assets in Europe, a region which many believe is declining, they were concern about how Brexit impacts them. The declining Euro and GBP is a concern as well. As they are tapped into so many areas of world trade, investors were concerned about how the trade war between the United States vs China and Europe will impact them.

In recent times, it is Covid-19 and the plunge in oil prices.

There is definitely no escape for CKH. They tried to pillage the world. Now the world will royally fxxk them.

In the results update, we can learn more about how well they navigate these challenging times and how Covid-19 and the oil crisis have been for them.

Here we go.

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3 Important Things You Should Do Before Investing (Guest Post)

3 Important Things You Should Do Before Investing (Guest Post)

You tend to hear horror stories about people going into debt. Others are buried under thousands of dollars of credit card bills. Some are picking up extra jobs and taking out loans left and right. Having a good system to manage your finances is a smart idea if you want to stay out of debt and possibly save for the future. Here is a beginner’s guide to managing your money before investing.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, James Yeo is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as Smallcapasia and has 821 followers.

 

Image result for working guy with 2 hands on the head

You tend to hear horror stories about people going into debt. Others are buried under thousands of dollars of credit card bills. Some are picking up extra jobs and taking out loans left and right.

Having a good system to manage your finances is a smart idea if you want to stay out of debt and possibly save for the future. Here is a beginner’s guide to managing your money.
1. Set up a Rainy Day Fund

Contrary to popular belief, setting aside is the most #1 important thing you should do as compared to learning how to save or cutting down your debt etc.

This is because a rainy day emergency fund is for unplanned essential expenses, such as a sudden car repair or if you lose your job. The rule of thumb is to have:

Rainy Day Fund: At least 3 to 6 months of your expenses

The easy way to go about it is to just spend an excruciating month tabulating your expenses for the entire month. After that, smoothen out any irregular spike in expenses based on the number of months/years – example spending for staycation or travelling worth $5k should be divided by how many times you do it in a year.

After you build your emergency fund, you may consider building up your savings.

 

Image result for saving budget

 
2. Automate your savings budget

When most people think of a budget, they think of a set of rules. Now, something is telling them what they can and cannot buy.

While this definition or practice is supposedly correct, i find that (from my friends) it rarely works. Its more of a theory thing.

Reason being that people will always spend whatever they have to the last dime and savings will only come by if there’s extra – but there wouldn’t be any!

So instead, we should all practise automation when it comes to our budget – Open a separate savings account and establish a automatic transfer of at least 10% of our take-home income.

Better still – Don’t apply any atm card for that account. Because…

You can’t use what you can’t see!

3. Protection before Earning

Last but not least, it is wise to have enough insurance coverage even before you start investing.

No matter how much you can earn, one illness can rob you of all these riches instantly. Health is always more important than Wealth.

Hence, you have to at least protect your downside (hedging) through insurance before you start to embark on the route to investing.

Conclusion

The first principle of managing your money is to live within your means. Always spend less than what you make and keep to your budget.

Once you have a strong foundation, you will not panic when your investments suddenly turn sour – just like the vicious spread of coronavirus which sent the markets into a tailspin.

Thanks for reading.

Once again, this article is a guest post and was originally posted on Smallcapasias profile on InvestingNote. 

Become a part of our community and also see what other investors are saying about the current market right now: (click on the view now button)

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Trading Profitably In Extremely Volatile Market Conditions [LIVE WEBINAR]

Trading Profitably In Extremely Volatile Market Conditions [LIVE WEBINAR]

Stock markets around the globe are tumbling.

Here’s how much the S&P 500 dropped since 2 months ago:screen-shot-2020-03-16-at-5-08-09-pm

The STI is also not spared:

screen-shot-2020-03-16-at-5-06-14-pm

Did it look obvious enough that the markets would’ve plunged so much?

Or did the thought of catching the bottom crossed your mind more than once?

If either or both these thoughts have ever crossed your mind, you’re not alone.

What if there was a systematic way of approaching the markets?

To help you with that, we’ve veteran trader Collin Seow, an ex top-tier remisier in Phillip Securities for 12 years, a qualified Chartered Portfolio Manager (CPM) holding a Certified Financial Technician (CFTe) qualification and a member of MENSA Singapore, who will show you how he is Trading Profitably In Extremely Volatile Market Conditions.

collin

In this 2 hour LIVE webinar, Collin Seow will be covering on the 3 immensely powerful combination strategies that you can use immediately, especially during such volatile markets:
✔ Swing Trade Strategy
✔ GMMA Strategy
✔ The K-Wave Indicator

Also, engage in Q&A with Collin during this exclusive live webinar.

Attend anywhere from the comforts of your own home or office.

The full recording of this entire webinar will also be given to you.

Date & Time: Wednesday March 25th, 2020, 7:00 – 9.00PM
Venue: Watch Online

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Download our free app here:

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