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5 Reasons to Invest in the LionGlobal Dynamic Growth: Asian Perspective Portfolio (guest post)

5 Reasons to Invest in the LionGlobal Dynamic Growth: Asian Perspective Portfolio (guest post)

Lion Global Investors (“Lion Global”) – one of Asia’s leading asset management companies, has recently announced the launch of their latest managed portfolio –LionGlobal Dynamic Growth: Asian Perspective, exclusively available through Saxo Markets’ platforms.

 This post was originally posted here. The writer, Brian Halim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with a username known as @3Fs and has 2,000+ followers.

Led by experienced professionals and portfolio managers, the Lion Global Investors’ Curated Portfolios team has curated a globally diversified multi-asset portfolio designed with an Asian lens. This means the portfolio retains its global characteristics but provides an additional strategic exposure to China, broad Asia and the Emerging Markets as key sources of future yield and growth potential.

Previously, Saxo Markets’ other managed portfolios were created with other industry leading names such as BlackRock, Nasdaq Dorsey Wright, Morningstar and Brown Advisory.

The new portfolio is suitable for investors who are looking to achieve superior risk-adjusted returns ensuring risks taken are commensurate with potential returns, particularly in industry and geographical sectors that will be booming in the next few years.

In this article, I have listed 5 reasons why the LionGlobal Dynamic Growth: Asian Perspective portfolio might be suitable for you:

1.) Globally Diversified Portfolio With Targeted Exposure to Asia and the Emerging Markets

The portfolio comprises of nine best-in-class mutual funds and low-cost ETFs and is managed dynamically by investment professionals so its composition can change and respond to market events.

The Curated Portfolios team uses open architecture when selecting funds. Therefore, they can select any fund available on Saxo Markets’ platform. Lion Global does not receive trailer fees from any of the fund managers of funds selected in the portfolio and this allows them to remain objective in their fund selection process.

The portfolio is well diversified across major asset classes (Equities/Fixed Income/Commodities) and Regions (Developed markets/Emerging markets/US/Europe/Asia). Leveraging on Lion’s Global’s expertise in Asian markets, the Asian lens means there is additional strategic exposure to China, broad Asia and the Emerging Markets as key sources of future yield and growth potential compared to a typical global portfolio that may have less weighting to these regions as they tend to lean more towards the US and European equities and fixed income.

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Upcoming LIVE Webinar: How Investors Can Beat The Market Tomorrow: ​ Ask A Portfolio Manager Today

Upcoming LIVE Webinar: How Investors Can Beat The Market Tomorrow: ​ Ask A Portfolio Manager Today

How Investors Can Beat The Market Tomorrow? Here’s your chance to ask a Portfolio Manager Today!

Register here: http://bit.ly/3uZePM…

phillip-webinar-copy
The last decade saw an exponential acceleration in technological advancement. What will the next 5 years, or even the next decade look like from today?

In this webinar, we’d be asking Ryan Tan, a portfolio manager from Phillip Securities (A member of PhillipCapital), this vital question.

Hear from an active Portfolio Manager – on how he invests for both the mid and long-term, his key investing principles and his past performance.

He will also be sharing how he identifies growth companies for his portfolio in the long run – including some names in the Electric Vehicle (EV) sector.

Don’t miss this exclusive webinar where insights are shared directly by a Portfolio Manager. This is also your chance to ask Ryan questions during the Q&A.

Date: 28th Apr Wednesday
Time: 8 – 9PM

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Ryan Tan is a Portfolio Manager at PhillipCapital (MAS Rep No: TML300119869) with over 25 years of investment experience. He is a mechanical engineer by training with real-life global industries experience. He joined Phillip Securities under one of their pro-trader scheme and was appointed as a Fund Management Representative in 2017.


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Key Highlights in Ascendas REIT’s Q3 FY2020 Business Updates (Guest Post)

Key Highlights in Ascendas REIT’s Q3 FY2020 Business Updates (Guest Post)

Here are the key highlights of Ascendas REIT – Results and business updates.

An Ascend-ing REIT? - Analysis of Ascendas REIT (Part 2)

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Lim Jun Yuan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with a username known as @ljunyuan and has 1421 followers.

Another blue-chip REIT in my long-term investment portfolio (you can check out a list of all the companies I’ve invested here), Ascendas REIT (SGX:A17U), released its business updates for the third quarter of the financial year 2020 (ended 30 September) after market hours yesterday (26 October 2020.)

As the REIT have switched to half-yearly reporting for the first and third quarter, there are no updates on their financial results. Likewise, there are also no dividends declared for the two quarters as the REIT have switched to paying out unitholders on a semi-annual basis.

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Mapletree Industrial Trust – A Summary of its Q2 and FY2020/21 Performance (Guest Post)

Mapletree Industrial Trust – A Summary of its Q2 and FY2020/21 Performance (Guest Post)

Mapletree Industrial Trust: A Summary of its Q2 and FY2020/21 Performance

Mapletree Industrial Trust posts 1% dip in 2Q DPU of 3.10 cents on enlarged unit base | The Edge Singapore

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Lim Jun Yuan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with a username known as @ljunyuan and has 1422 followers.

Mapletree Industrial Trust is a new addition made on Monday (26 October 2020) at S$3.10, that is if you’ve been keeping tabs on my personal long-term investment portfolio (you can check it out here), you would have noticed that  Based on a distribution payout of 12.24 cents/unit in FY2019/20, even though the yield is just 3.9%, but given its track record in the management increasing its distribution payouts to its unitholders over the years, along with sound business fundamentals, I am confident of the blue-chip industrial REIT’s growth in the years ahead – I have done a writeup about the REIT last month, which you can read up here to learn more about the REIT.

After trading hours yesterday (27 October 2020), the REIT released its financial results for the second quarter of the financial year 2020/21 (it has a financial year-end every 31 March.) As a unitholder, I have studied through its latest set of financial results, debt and portfolio occupancy profile, along with its distribution payout to unitholders (the REIT is one that pays out its unitholders on a quarterly basis), and in this post, I will be sharing with you the most important aspects about its latest updates to take note of, along with my personal thoughts to share.

Let’s begin…

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The Clorox Company (NYSE:CLX) – Does the Company Make a Good Addition to Your Investment Portfolio? (Guest Post)

The Clorox Company (NYSE:CLX) – Does the Company Make a Good Addition to Your Investment Portfolio? (Guest Post)

Is The Clorox Company a good addition to your investment portfolio?

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Lim Jun Yuan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as @ljunyuan and has 1408 followers.

NYSE-listed The Clorox Company (NYSE:CLX) has products on the supermarket shelves that clean and disinfect our homes. What with the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, people have been stepping up their hygiene standards at home so as to protect themselves as well as their loved ones from being part of the Covid-19 statistic.

Apart from Clorox, some of the brands you should be familiar with (which is also from the company) include Glad’s range of plastic food wraps and food bags (you can check out their range of products on the website of supermarket retailers Cold Storage and Giant), Liquid-Plumr’s range of decloggers (again, you can check out the range of products sold in Singapore on the website of Cold Storage and Giant), as well as Burt’s Bees range of skincare products (you can check out their range of products on Sephora Singapore’s website here.)

In my writeup about The Clorox Company today, I will be sharing with you a bit more about the company’s other businesses, followed by looking at its historical financial performance, debt profile, and dividend payout to its shareholders over the past 6 financial years (as the company has a financial year-end every 30 June, I will be looking at its financial results between FY2014/15 and FY2019/20.) On top of that, I will also be sharing whether or not at its current traded price, is the company considered ‘cheap’ or ‘expensive’ based on its current vs. its historical valuations.

Let’s get started…

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Uncertainty Breeds Returns (Guest Post)

Uncertainty Breeds Returns (Guest Post)

An increase in uncertainty in the global markets has exacerbated the dollar bull market and market outperformance.

Forecasting in a Time of Uncertainty: Tech Markets • sopsa.org

 This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with a username known as @kyith and has 1091 followers.


With the FED having a mandate to hold the short-term interest rate for a prolonged period of time and their willingness to let inflation run above 2%, it makes us wonders if interest rates would ever tick up amongst the uncertainty.

BCA Research points out that in the past 30 years, there has been a strong link between major moves in real 10-year yields and the amount of excess savings in the economy.

Currently, the gross private savings have been very well boosted by the fiscal stimulus but also that people tend to become more prudent when things are uncertain.

As people’s salary regain traction and consumer sentiment recovers, it is likely the savings rate will decline and perhaps yield might start moderating upwards.

I am thinking less about the REITs but more about whether the insurance companies and the finance company can finally have some yield spread to play with so as to earn some interest income. This would change the picture for the financials and insurance company as to whether there is a catalyst for the share price to do well.

BCA has this idea for people to remain overweight global equities in your core positions but it would be good to pair with a portfolio of stocks to short. These are the stocks that are particularly vulnerable if the market corrects.

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Capturing Returns – Diversification, Concentration, or Both? (Guest Post)

Capturing Returns – Diversification, Concentration, or Both? (Guest Post)

Dimensional did a study on the impact of diversification on the probability of outperforming the market benchmark. In this case, they are using the MSCI All Country World Index (which you can invest with the VWRA listed on the London Stock Exchange).

Diversification - DayTrading.com

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as kyith and has 1091 followers.

Not too long ago, there are talks that the markets have been hard-carry by the largest capitalized companies in the United States.

The worrying thing is whether this is healthy or not. I think over the years, Dimensional Fund Advisers have a few good research piece on this.

The largest holdings of the MSCI World index are currently Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet. Together they make up 13.5% of the index. This is not too concentrated.

However, if we peep at the S&P 500, these 5 make up 22% of the index.

These indexes are market capitalization-weighted, which means as certain companies get stronger, their share price performs better, they get bigger, their returns drive the returns more.


Weight of the largest stocks by market capitalization in the US market from 1927 to 2019

Some companies stay on top for a long time:

  1. AT&T was the largest two for six straight decades beginning in 1930
  2. General Motors and General Electric was in the top 10 at the start of multiple decades
  3. IBM and Exxon were the mainstays for some time

Here is a clearer view:


Largest 10 stocks at the start of each decade

Prior to the 1980s, the larger companies were more dominant than today.

There is always another story to tell: There were a lot of dominant companies in the past. They dominate for decades. And now they are gone.

I am not saying that Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet will falter. They have strong moats. They could stay for 3 decades and your investments in them would do well.

However, the lesson here is that its not that unsurprising for them to falter.

How Poor Would Your Performance bet if You Missed out on the Top Performers?

The FAANG stocks are represented by Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, and Google. For the past decades, if you have invested in them you would have done really well.

But how would the US broad market do without these FAANG Stocks?

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InvestingNote Feature Series – Virtual Investment Stock Portfolio

InvestingNote Feature Series – Virtual Investment Stock Portfolio

InvestingNote platform is designed with a myriad of features for investors to share investment ideas, track stock prices, stay updated with stock calendar and alerts, set up their own virtual investment stock portfolio.

portfolio-page

In today’s post, we will be sharing about the portfolio feature in the platform. You may find the portfolio button at the top navigation panel as shown below.

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3 Things to Think about before You ‘Average Down’ on Your Shareholdings in a Company (Guest Post)

3 Things to Think about before You ‘Average Down’ on Your Shareholdings in a Company (Guest Post)

I have received a number of emails and private messages the past couple of days seeking my advise on whether they should “average down” their shareholdings in a company.

How To Catch A Falling Knife (Stock That Is Rapidly Falling)

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Lim Jun Yuan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 1055  followers.

While I am unable to give you a definite answer on whether or not you should “average down”, as all investors think and do things differently, and are unique in their own ways, but there are a few things (3 in particular) you can ask yourself which I hope will help you make the final decision.

Before I reveal what these three things are, let me first talk a bit about what does “averaging down” mean (for those who may be hearing about this for the first time) – in layman terms, it simply mean you increase your shareholdings in a company that is currently trading at a lower price, and in so doing, you bring down the average price of your shareholdings in the company.

To explain this with a simple example, let’s say you originally have 1,000 shares of Company A at S$10.00. However, the share price of Company A is now trading at just S$5.00, and the act of “averaging down” means you increase your shareholdings in Company A at its current trading price; assuming you decide to buy another 1,000 shares at S$5.00, then the average price of your shareholdings in Company A becomes S$7.50 now, which can be calculated as follows:

Initial Purchase: 1,000 shares x S$10.00/share = S$10,000

Additional Purchase: 1,000 shares x S$5.00/share = S$5,000

In total, you have now invested a total of S$15,000 in 2,000 shares of Company A.

As such, your average price in Company A is S$15,000 divided by 2,000 shares = S$7.50

Now that you have a better understanding of what “averaging down” means, let me share the three things you can look at to help you decide whether or not you should do so:

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Top 4 Reasons You Should Not Panic As An Investor (Guest Post)

Top 4 Reasons You Should Not Panic As An Investor (Guest Post)

I know your portfolio is in a deep sea of red, but what I want to tell you is this – you’re not alone. Many investors are also suffering from a huge unrealised loss in their portfolio, myself included (as at time of writing, my long-term investment portfolio is down by 20.0%.) And in case you might be thinking I am a “veteran” in investing, I only have about 2+ years of experience as a full-time retail investor, and is my first time I’m experiencing a stock market decline like this.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 736 followers.

 

On Monday evening (16 March 2020), Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin announced the lockdown of Malaysia for a period of 14 days (from 18 March to 31 March) in a bid to stem the further spread of Covid-19 in the country.

Almost immediately, I read about news of fellow Singaporeans rushing to the supermarkets (even though its already late into the evening) to sweep them clean of fresh produces out of panic that supplies in Singapore may be cut as a result of the lockdown in Malaysia (as many of our fresh produces are imported from the country.)

I see some parallels happening in the stock market as well, especially over the past two weeks, where I see many investors emptying their portfolios and rushing for the exit doors out of fear.

I know your portfolio is in a deep sea of red, but what I want to tell you is this – you’re not alone. Many investors are also suffering from a huge unrealised loss in their portfolio, myself included (as at time of writing, my long-term investment portfolio is down by 20.0%.) And in case you might be thinking I am a “veteran” in investing, I only have about 2+ years of experience as a full-time retail investor, and this is the first time I’m experiencing a stock market decline like this (I hope that after hearing this, it makes you feel better.)

Before you make any rash decisions, I suggest you calm yourself down, and ask yourself the following 4 questions:

1. Why are You Investing in the First Place?

Image result for investing

I’d like you to recall the moment you make the commitment to invest – why did you make the decision?

Some may decide to invest because they want to build a high yielding portfolio (with yields higher than their CPF Special Account), some may be more focused on the eventual capital gain they could possibly get from their investments, while for some, it may be a mixture of both.

So, which group do you belong to?

 

2. Why did You Choose to Invest in those Companies in Your Current Portfolio?

I certainly hope your answer to this question is not, “because of hearsay.”

Prior to investing your hard-earned money in a company, I really hope that you have done a thorough research about it, and have a good knowledge of the company’s businesses, financials, debt profile, dividend payouts, etc. well enough before you make the eventual decision to invest in it.

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