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The Clorox Company (NYSE:CLX) – Does the Company Make a Good Addition to Your Investment Portfolio?

The Clorox Company (NYSE:CLX) – Does the Company Make a Good Addition to Your Investment Portfolio?

Is The Clorox Company a good addition to your investment portfolio?

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Lim Jun Yuan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as @ljunyuan and has 1408 followers.

NYSE-listed The Clorox Company (NYSE:CLX) has products on the supermarket shelves that clean and disinfect our homes. What with the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, people have been stepping up their hygiene standards at home so as to protect themselves as well as their loved ones from being part of the Covid-19 statistic.

Apart from Clorox, some of the brands you should be familiar with (which is also from the company) include Glad’s range of plastic food wraps and food bags (you can check out their range of products on the website of supermarket retailers Cold Storage and Giant), Liquid-Plumr’s range of decloggers (again, you can check out the range of products sold in Singapore on the website of Cold Storage and Giant), as well as Burt’s Bees range of skincare products (you can check out their range of products on Sephora Singapore’s website here.)

In my writeup about The Clorox Company today, I will be sharing with you a bit more about the company’s other businesses, followed by looking at its historical financial performance, debt profile, and dividend payout to its shareholders over the past 6 financial years (as the company has a financial year-end every 30 June, I will be looking at its financial results between FY2014/15 and FY2019/20.) On top of that, I will also be sharing whether or not at its current traded price, is the company considered ‘cheap’ or ‘expensive’ based on its current vs. its historical valuations.

Let’s get started…

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Uncertainty Breeds Returns

Uncertainty Breeds Returns

An increase in uncertainty in the global markets has exacerbated the dollar bull market and market outperformance.

Forecasting in a Time of Uncertainty: Tech Markets • sopsa.org

 This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with a username known as @kyith and has 1091 followers.


With the FED having a mandate to hold the short-term interest rate for a prolonged period of time and their willingness to let inflation run above 2%, it makes us wonders if interest rates would ever tick up amongst the uncertainty.

BCA Research points out that in the past 30 years, there has been a strong link between major moves in real 10-year yields and the amount of excess savings in the economy.

Currently, the gross private savings have been very well boosted by the fiscal stimulus but also that people tend to become more prudent when things are uncertain.

As people’s salary regain traction and consumer sentiment recovers, it is likely the savings rate will decline and perhaps yield might start moderating upwards.

I am thinking less about the REITs but more about whether the insurance companies and the finance company can finally have some yield spread to play with so as to earn some interest income. This would change the picture for the financials and insurance company as to whether there is a catalyst for the share price to do well.

BCA has this idea for people to remain overweight global equities in your core positions but it would be good to pair with a portfolio of stocks to short. These are the stocks that are particularly vulnerable if the market corrects.

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Capturing Returns – Diversification, Concentration, or Both?

Capturing Returns – Diversification, Concentration, or Both?

Dimensional did a study on the impact of diversification on the probability of outperforming the market benchmark. In this case, they are using the MSCI All Country World Index (which you can invest with the VWRA listed on the London Stock Exchange).

Diversification - DayTrading.com

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Kyith Ng is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as kyith and has 1091 followers.

Not too long ago, there are talks that the markets have been hard-carry by the largest capitalized companies in the United States.

The worrying thing is whether this is healthy or not. I think over the years, Dimensional Fund Advisers have a few good research piece on this.

The largest holdings of the MSCI World index are currently Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet. Together they make up 13.5% of the index. This is not too concentrated.

However, if we peep at the S&P 500, these 5 make up 22% of the index.

These indexes are market capitalization-weighted, which means as certain companies get stronger, their share price performs better, they get bigger, their returns drive the returns more.


Weight of the largest stocks by market capitalization in the US market from 1927 to 2019

Some companies stay on top for a long time:

  1. AT&T was the largest two for six straight decades beginning in 1930
  2. General Motors and General Electric was in the top 10 at the start of multiple decades
  3. IBM and Exxon were the mainstays for some time

Here is a clearer view:


Largest 10 stocks at the start of each decade

Prior to the 1980s, the larger companies were more dominant than today.

There is always another story to tell: There were a lot of dominant companies in the past. They dominate for decades. And now they are gone.

I am not saying that Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet will falter. They have strong moats. They could stay for 3 decades and your investments in them would do well.

However, the lesson here is that its not that unsurprising for them to falter.

How Poor Would Your Performance bet if You Missed out on the Top Performers?

The FAANG stocks are represented by Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, and Google. For the past decades, if you have invested in them you would have done really well.

But how would the US broad market do without these FAANG Stocks?

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InvestingNote Feature Series – Virtual Investment Stock Portfolio

InvestingNote Feature Series – Virtual Investment Stock Portfolio

InvestingNote platform is designed with a myriad of features for investors to share investment ideas, track stock prices, stay updated with stock calendar and alerts, set up their own virtual investment stock portfolio.

portfolio-page

In today’s post, we will be sharing about the portfolio feature in the platform. You may find the portfolio button at the top navigation panel as shown below.

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3 Things to Think about before You ‘Average Down’ on Your Shareholdings in a Company (Guest Post)

3 Things to Think about before You ‘Average Down’ on Your Shareholdings in a Company (Guest Post)

I have received a number of emails and private messages the past couple of days seeking my advise on whether they should “average down” their shareholdings in a company.

How To Catch A Falling Knife (Stock That Is Rapidly Falling)

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Lim Jun Yuan is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 1055  followers.

While I am unable to give you a definite answer on whether or not you should “average down”, as all investors think and do things differently, and are unique in their own ways, but there are a few things (3 in particular) you can ask yourself which I hope will help you make the final decision.

Before I reveal what these three things are, let me first talk a bit about what does “averaging down” mean (for those who may be hearing about this for the first time) – in layman terms, it simply mean you increase your shareholdings in a company that is currently trading at a lower price, and in so doing, you bring down the average price of your shareholdings in the company.

To explain this with a simple example, let’s say you originally have 1,000 shares of Company A at S$10.00. However, the share price of Company A is now trading at just S$5.00, and the act of “averaging down” means you increase your shareholdings in Company A at its current trading price; assuming you decide to buy another 1,000 shares at S$5.00, then the average price of your shareholdings in Company A becomes S$7.50 now, which can be calculated as follows:

Initial Purchase: 1,000 shares x S$10.00/share = S$10,000

Additional Purchase: 1,000 shares x S$5.00/share = S$5,000

In total, you have now invested a total of S$15,000 in 2,000 shares of Company A.

As such, your average price in Company A is S$15,000 divided by 2,000 shares = S$7.50

Now that you have a better understanding of what “averaging down” means, let me share the three things you can look at to help you decide whether or not you should do so:

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Top 4 Reasons You Should Not Panic As An Investor (Guest Post)

Top 4 Reasons You Should Not Panic As An Investor (Guest Post)

I know your portfolio is in a deep sea of red, but what I want to tell you is this – you’re not alone. Many investors are also suffering from a huge unrealised loss in their portfolio, myself included (as at time of writing, my long-term investment portfolio is down by 20.0%.) And in case you might be thinking I am a “veteran” in investing, I only have about 2+ years of experience as a full-time retail investor, and is my first time I’m experiencing a stock market decline like this.

This post was originally posted here. The writer, Jun Yuan Lim is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as ljunyuan and has 736 followers.

 

On Monday evening (16 March 2020), Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin announced the lockdown of Malaysia for a period of 14 days (from 18 March to 31 March) in a bid to stem the further spread of Covid-19 in the country.

Almost immediately, I read about news of fellow Singaporeans rushing to the supermarkets (even though its already late into the evening) to sweep them clean of fresh produces out of panic that supplies in Singapore may be cut as a result of the lockdown in Malaysia (as many of our fresh produces are imported from the country.)

I see some parallels happening in the stock market as well, especially over the past two weeks, where I see many investors emptying their portfolios and rushing for the exit doors out of fear.

I know your portfolio is in a deep sea of red, but what I want to tell you is this – you’re not alone. Many investors are also suffering from a huge unrealised loss in their portfolio, myself included (as at time of writing, my long-term investment portfolio is down by 20.0%.) And in case you might be thinking I am a “veteran” in investing, I only have about 2+ years of experience as a full-time retail investor, and this is the first time I’m experiencing a stock market decline like this (I hope that after hearing this, it makes you feel better.)

Before you make any rash decisions, I suggest you calm yourself down, and ask yourself the following 4 questions:

1. Why are You Investing in the First Place?

Image result for investing

I’d like you to recall the moment you make the commitment to invest – why did you make the decision?

Some may decide to invest because they want to build a high yielding portfolio (with yields higher than their CPF Special Account), some may be more focused on the eventual capital gain they could possibly get from their investments, while for some, it may be a mixture of both.

So, which group do you belong to?

 

2. Why did You Choose to Invest in those Companies in Your Current Portfolio?

I certainly hope your answer to this question is not, “because of hearsay.”

Prior to investing your hard-earned money in a company, I really hope that you have done a thorough research about it, and have a good knowledge of the company’s businesses, financials, debt profile, dividend payouts, etc. well enough before you make the eventual decision to invest in it.

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Buy & Hold (Guest Post)

Buy & Hold (Guest Post)

I been holding the current 9 stocks since 2016.
pie

This post was originally posted here. The writer, theintelligentinvestor is a veteran community member on InvestingNote, with username known as TII and 1100+ followers.

While there were some stocks that I have bought and sold off, most were done during 2016. There were hardly any position taken after 2017 so we can assume my portfolio as the aggregate of the 9 stocks and also it can be considered it as a buy & hold strategy with the holding period of 3.5 years.

Stocks.cafe provides the daily data of the portfolio time-weighted returns vs the STI ETF or ES3 which can be downloaded to Excel. I have plotted 2 graphs, the top is the my portfolio TII (in green) vs STI ETF (in Blue); the bottom is the difference between the 2 top lines.

The top graph first. The STI, since 2016, has moved within a window of -10% to +32%. The 2016 was quite flat; 2017 was a good year up 20%; 2018 was poor down -7%; and 2019 YTD is up 9%. The first point I want to make is if you are trying to trade during these 3.5 years which quite a lot of world events had happened. Well, you can try to hop in Feb 2016, enjoy the 2 years ride and get off in Mar 2018 and wait patiently for 9 months and get in back again around Dec 2018. Sounds simple but many will know it is not easy. When to get in, when to get out, how long to wait during in and out periods? There are just too many variables and moving parts to make sense of.

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2018 XIRR Performance & Networth Updates (Guest Post)

2018 XIRR Performance & Networth Updates (Guest Post)

This post was originally posted here. The writer is a veteran community member and blogger on InvestingNote, with username known as 3Fs, with more than 1,000+ followers.

Time really flies these days when we are in our mid 30s, pegged by a combination of busy work and heavy loads of watching our children grow as each year past by.

I wanted to wrap things up for the year given that I will be taking a holiday trip to Bali with my family for the next few days until Christmas, and wanted to do a reflection of my equity performance this year before I then wrap things up for 2018 on an overall scale.

I received some good feedbacks last year on how I presented with my performance review, especially clearly positioning my winners and losers so I thought I’d continued with the same format for this year.

Please bear with me as this will be a pretty long post.

Overall Market Thoughts

This was a tough and rough year for investors because this was supposed to be an expansion year where interest rates are going higher because the economy is improving and there wasn’t a clear sign of global slowdown in the economy yet the market experienced some of the highest volatility we’ve seen in many years due to the trade wars and other stuff.

All major indexes including the DJI, S&P, Nasdaq, HKEX, Nikkei, DAX were all down for the year and STI was not spared either.

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